We live in the time when

Because if you are reading this you are thinking of leaving the
Motherland to find

1) a better life;

2) better-paid job;

3) inspiration;

4) the change of
settings;

5) experience… maybe

6) a husband/wife/nice chic… oops Have I guessed?


Leaving home seems easy within the borders of the home country, tough and sad while gathering dozens of docs for the embassy, inspiring while booking a ticket, tingling while crossing the border with the other country and…. terribly difficult there – in your Destination Country.

This is a black scenario if you are not prepared. I followed this scenario when I left my country for Poland. I think you could avoid my mistakes if you carefully read these remarks. So, let’s go through a Question List that will help us find the vulnerabilities.

1. WILL I FEEL HOMESICK? MY FAMILY AND FRIENDS ARE FAR AWAY…

Definitely, not if you socialize and try to establish contacts with other people. People need to socialize by nature. We are social creatures and should be in the group of others who are the similar to us to feel satisfied emotionally. You are on the board of the plane that during next hours cross the Atlantic or in the train where local Ukrainian smugglers try to hide cheap Ukrainian cigarettes, start the conversation, suggest help or a sandwich.

I have got to know a lot of people who headed for the same city as me and even studied in the same university. If you come across a good person you may at worst make fun during your journey, or meet for a coffee in the town later.

The more contacts you make, the safer you will feel abroad. Remember – you will have no friends for some time in the beginning in a completely new country, so good to start from the first minute of your journey and there will be plus one acquaintance. You will have to be more open-minded and sociable during your stay in the country. You will feel homesick forever staying abroad, unless you do it.

2.WHERE WILL I STAY WHEN I ARRIVE THERE?

Good to count for at least 2 weeks in a hotel before you find something. Use local
newspapers that have ads on renting flats or find out which internet sites have such
ads. Look for FB groups something like “Accommodation in Warsaw” ); search in a search machine “Flats in Warsaw for rent”(for Warsaw City, for example). It is better to search in a local language.

Here important ! Don’t count on agencies, because they frequently fool people. It
looks like this: you pay the agency money, they may use the sources to find the offers that you can find and use on your own (they have no or a very of small number of exclusive offers). Later you will have to contact the owner of a flat, agree on the date to come and see the flat. If you and the owner are satisfied you will finally sign the agreement. Though there are no guarantees for a successful deal. Keep in mind that probably you will not  find a flat in several days.

3. WHAT IF I GET ILL?

Do not worry. If you have a national insurance that’s all right. Do not count on the
insurance you get at home – this one usually covers only urgent cases. For example, if you are run by the bus and your leg falls somewhere to the adjacent bushes. You need at least this one if you apply for a visa. Purchase it, but consider the national insurance companies that will cover the visit to a doctor even in case of a pure headache. Probably you will be able to buy it only after you come to the destination country. It is important to read the contract and make sure the insurance covers everything.

4. HOW WILL I MANAGE MOVING AROUND A NEW CITY?

It is better to have a navigator, especially if you are of a female gender. Personally, I had a lot of problems finding places without a map. Only a Navigator app would help me out. Therefore, I recommend buying a mobile SIM card with some traffic to use. Some cities are not very Wi-Fi friendly!

5. HOW WILL I COOK ON MY OWN?

Look up some recipes and practice at home. During your stay you will be able to compete with the best cooks. A common dinner would be a good activity to compare your cooking skills with your new friends’ abroad. When abroad invite your new friends to your flat or dorm asking to bring some of their national specialities to eat. It is better to be surrounded with people at least during the first month of your stay
abroad.

6. HOW WILL I LOOK FOR A JOB ABROAD?

Being at home find out which internet sites contain ads with job offers, send your CV from home and arrange appointments. Remember you have to be sure you can work in the framework of your visa. More often you will have to get a work permit. If you are a student do not count on a 40-hours working week. There are laws that specify the permitted number of days. National laws differ from country to country, but the information is always available on governmental sites.

Hope the list will be useful and you will quickly become a part of a new community abroad. Things are not easy when we do it for the first time, but what doesn’t kill us, will surely make us stronger. Don’t you agree?

 

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